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Corona Virus travels up to 4 meters and last longer in the Air

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A new study examining air samples from hospital wards with COVID-19 patients has found the virus can travel up to 13 feet (four meters) — twice the distance current guidelines say people should leave between themselves in public.

The preliminary results of the investigation by Chinese researchers were published Friday in Emerging Infectious Diseases, a journal of the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

They add to a growing debate on how the disease is transmitted, with the scientists themselves cautioning that the small quantities of virus they found at this distance are not necessarily infectious.

The researchers, led by a team at the Academy of Military Medical Sciences in Beijing, tested surface and air samples from an intensive care unit and a general COVID-19 ward at Huoshenshan Hospital in Wuhan. They housed a total of 24 patients between February 19 and March 2.

 

They found that the virus was most heavily concentrated on the floors of the wards, “perhaps because of gravity and air flow causing most virus droplets to float to the ground.”

 

High levels were also found on frequently touched surfaces like computer mice, trashcans, bed rails and door knobs.

“Furthermore, half of the samples from the soles of the ICU medical staff shoes tested positive,” the team wrote. “Therefore, the soles of medical staff shoes might function as carriers.”

They found that virus-laden aerosols were mainly concentrated near and downstream from patients at up to 13 feet — though smaller quantities were found upstream, up to eight feet.

The World Health Organization has so far downplayed the risk.

US health authorities have adopted a more cautious line and urged people to cover their faces when out in public in case the virus can be transmitted through normal breathing and speaking.

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UK parliament debate petitions on the violence surrounding the #endSars protest in Nigeria

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Members of the UK parliament on Monday, November 23, held a debate on the petition to the United Kingdom government seeking a sanction on some Nigerian government officials by the EndSARS protesters over gross human right abuse.


During a sitting at the Westminster Hall, the lawmakers took turns to slam the President Muhammadu Buhari-led government for the poor handling of the protest. The debate for the petition tagged ‘e-petition 554150′ was led by Theresa Villiers, a member of the British Conservative Party. Parliamentarians who spoke raised eyebrows against the defence of the federal government that there was no shooting at the Lekki toll gate.

While describing the “Nigerian government’s violence against its own citizens” as intensifying, Kate Osamor, a member who is representing Edmonton, said the corruption and police brutality still continue. Osamor also described as “undemocratic conduct” the claim by the minister of information and culture, Lai Mohammed, that the killing and shooting at Lekki, as contained in a CNN report, is fake news.


The member said:

“The Nigerian government needs to stop freezing bank accounts of key protesters; it needs to stop illegal detentions of key protesters. “We are aware that some protesters have reported facing intimidation and the British High Commissioner in Abuja continues to raise our concerns about intimidation of civil society groups and peaceful protesters with the Nigerian government.” The UK parliament said it would continue to communicate with the governor of Lagos state, Babajide Sanwo-Olu, and a top member of the Nigerian presidency.

The parliament concluded that “future sanctions could reduce the impact of the designations.”

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