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In pictures: Locust swarms in East Africa

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A man attempts to fend off a swarm of desert locusts at a ranch near the town of Nanyuki, in Laikipia county, Kenya
Men try to repel locusts flying over grazing land in Lemasulani village, Samburu county, KenyaThe insects, which eat their own body weight in food every day, are breeding so fast numbers could grow four hundredfold by June.
 
A swarm of newly hatched desert locusts are seen on a tree as men look on, near the town of Archers Post, Samburu countyIn January, the UN appealed for $76m (£59m) to tackle the crisis.
That figure has now risen to $138m.

A man walks by locusts in the region of Kyuso, KenyaBut so far, only $52m has been received, $10m of which has come this week from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

Uganda Peoples Defence Forces soldiers spray trees with insecticides in OtukeThe main threats are in East Africa and Yemen, as well the Gulf states, Iran, Pakistan and India.

A stalk of sorghum seeds partially eaten by locusts (left) is held next to an undamaged stalk in Nairobi, Kenya

Swarms feed on shea trees, an important source of food and income for local farmers, in OtukeMost recently, locusts have been seen in the Democratic Republic of Congo and swarms have arrived in Kuwait, Bahrain and Qatar and along the coast of Iran.
A UPDF soldier prepares pesticide equipment in Katakwi

A UPDF soldier sprays plants with insecticides in OtukeAerial and ground spraying combined with constant tracking of the swarms are viewed as the most effective strategies.
But Desert Locust Control Organization for Eastern Africa head Stephen Njoka told BBC News aircraft were in short supply.
Currently, Ethiopia was using five and Kenya six for spraying and four for surveying, he said.
A woman holds a plastic bottle filled with locusts in Lopei, UgandaBut the Kenyan government says it needs 20 planes for spraying – and a continuous supply of the pesticide Fenitrothion.
A desert locust is held in KatakwiKenya has trained more than 240 personnel from affected counties in monitoring of locust swarms.
 
A man runs through a desert locust swarm in the bush near Enziu, Kitui county, about 200km (124 miles) east of the capital, NairobiThe Chinese government announced in February it was sending a team of experts to neighbouring Pakistan to develop “targeted programmes” against the locusts.
A local tour guide holds a handful of dead desert locusts in Shaba National Reserve in Isiolo, northern KenyaLu Lizhi, a senior researcher with the Zhejiang Academy of Agricultural Sciences, told Bloomberg the ducks were “biological weapons”.
And while chickens could eat about 70 locusts in one day, a duck could devour more than three times that number.
“Ducks like to stay in a group, so they are easier to manage than chickens,” he told Chinese media.
A desert locust swarm flies over a bush in Ololokwe, Samburu county
 

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Why we have not ended the strike – ASUU

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Academic Staff Union of Universities (ASUU) has stated that the federal government is frustrating the union, hence the reason for the ongoing strike.

Speaking on Friday, October 30, on Channels TV, Prof Biodun Ogunyemi, the national president of the union, stated that the federal government has not maintained a sincere position in consenting the demands of the union. Ogunyemi further explained that ASUU has tabled five demands to the federal government which have not been fully entertained.He emphasised that “necessary steps” have not been taken especially concerning the adoption of its preferred home-grown University Transparency and Accountability Solution (UTAS) which is one of its demands. It would be recalled that for the second time in a week, the meeting between the leadership of ASUU and the federal government ended in deadlock. The meeting, which was held on Wednesday, October 28, hit the rock as both parties failed to reach a unilateral agreement on the adoption of UTAS. A federal government team led by the minister of labour and employment, Chris Ngige, refused that the N30billion earned allowance promised to the lecturers be paid through a platform different from IPPIS. ASUU chairman, Professor Biodun Ogunyemi, however, stood the ground that the payment should be made through UTAS. Eventually, both sides agreed to consult their principals, with another meeting scheduled to hold next week Wednesday, November 4. Speaking to the press after the meeting, the ASUU chairman said:

“The strike is still on as a result of the FG not taking the necessary steps. We gave them two weeks to address our five points demands.”

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